Talk:Yodeling

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Transwikied[edit]

Template:Transwikied to Wiktionary

What does the above mean? Hyacinth 00:09, 3 Apr 2005 (UTC)

This article has content that would be useful at WP's sister project, Wiktionary (indeed it was requested). Therefore, the text and page history now exists at Transwiki:Yodeling, which is a transitional page before it is formatted for a dictionary entry on Wiktionary. As this page is clearly encyclopedic as well as giving a dictionary defintion of yodeling, I am removing the notice here so it will not be listed for deletion.--Dmcdevit 01:20, 3 Apr 2005 (UTC)

Origins, head voice[edit]

another loada bull,"the" yodel as heard in country music was born out of the morris dance, a folk music from abbots bromley, in the olden england. ya can still hear it sometimes, some country artists do it to give it some spice.

Unfortunately, the author displays a lack of understanding of both vocalic function ("chest voice, " or "voce di petto", and "head voice", or "voce di testa", are vocal registers distinct from "falsetto", the entirely different means of vocal production employed in yodeling which gives is its distinctive sound) and the common use of yodeling in contemporary popular music (e.g. Jeff Buckley, pj harvey, Frou Frou, and many others). I would strongly dispute the validity and usefulness of this article. cf. Miller, García, et al. [remededefortune]

I concur, it seems like yodelers use head voice to me. However, neither claims have been backed up with citations - I shall change it to 'falsetto or head voice" —Preceding unsigned comment added by 92.0.224.187 (talk) 18:42, 11 April 2009 (UTC)

Taylor Ware???[edit]

Of all the people who are known for yodeling, Taylor Ware gets a mention? Are her 15 minutes of fame seriously worth putting in this article? Arx Fortis 22:55, 18 July 2006 (UTC)

Since there are no comments, I will likely leave the quote on the page until after this season of the show is over. If it was removed now, someone would just add it back. Objections? Arx Fortis 20:20, 8 August 2006 (UTC)

    • You are quite right, even though at her age, she is quite fantastic. After exhausted months of trying last year we finally got two of the most famous African American yodelers posted on this site. No, not Charley Pride. As of this year, that information has been removed by entities unknown and Wikipedia alleges no knowledge of such. I even sent them copies of their own pages hosting that information and they have refused to open them to see that it really existed??? [Joe Arnold, Roughshod Records]

What's with the edit war over the examples?[edit]

So I probably should've looked at the history before I added my contribution from the Sound of Music. I see that someone keeps deleting most of the examples, including a much better version of my contribution. Why? Is there a need to call for a lockdown? Nerwen 07:28, 3 May 2007 (UTC)

Update: All right, I restored the last good copy before all the pointless vandal edit wars, and then incorporated the good bits from the most recent version. Should be all good now and hopefully the random vandalism has passed. Nerwen 08:27, 5 May 2007 (UTC)
I deleted copyvio blatant advertising pasted from www.cdbaby.com/cd/mikejohnson. Who is this Mike Johnson anyway? He doesn't seem to be Michael Johnson (singer).--Shantavira|feed me 12:23, 30 June 2007 (UTC)

It seems that we have persistent vandals from the 70.226.* and 71.252.* blocks. They invariably delete Kerry Christiansen. I've looked him up, and he's notable enough to be in the list of examples. I suspect it's one person who has some kind of personal vendetta against Kerry Christiansen. Nerwen 08:08, 26 August 2007 (UTC)

See Also[edit]

Doo-wop? What does doo-wop have to do with yodelling (in preference to, say, rock or country?) I wasn't aware that yodelling formed a huge part in doo-wop. Perhaps I have lead too sheltered a life! Slothie 14:36, 10 October 2007 (UTC)

Beats me. I know nothing about yodelling, I'm just here to guard the article against blatant vandalism. Feel free to remove if you know better. ;) Nerwen 04:08, 12 October 2007 (UTC)

"Who is this Mike Johnson anyway?" If you did some actual research instead of speculation, you'd know that I'm country Music's no.1 Black Yodeler and that i've been yodeling more than 40 years. I've written over 150 yodeling songs and 114 are part of the Recorded Sound Reference Center's music collection at the Library of Congress in Washington DC. I did my first recording session in 1981 in Nashville Tn. and in 2012 released my 42nd CD. In january 2013 the Performing Arts Reading Room at the Library of Congress acquired a copy of my 390 page music anthology, " I Just Wanted To Be A Songwriter, a Mike Johnson Music Anthology" which features documentation of nearly everything that has been printed, produced, published, and distributed about, and by, me. I was inducted into America's Old Time Country Music Hall of Fame by the National Traditional Country Music Association in 2002. Type "Mike Johnson, Country Music's No.1 Black Yodeler" into your search browser and educate yourself. My youtube channell has over 400 of videos of me and a lot of my music friends performing around the country. Just a drop in the bucket of over 10 years of videos of me!!! Yours truly, Mike Johnson, Black Yodel No.1 — Preceding unsigned comment added by 71.252.103.74 (talk) 02:21, 8 April 2013 (UTC)

More[edit]

technique & history, less examples.--68.56.17.70 (talk) 04:47, 18 September 2008 (UTC)

Removed Content[edit]

Examples[edit]

  • The above content is unreferenced, random, and is just creating an unmanageable list of WP:Trivia, if someone can fix it, then by all means add it back. -- GateKeeper(X) @ 22:51, 16 December 2008 (UTC)
  • Needs sample[edit]

    This article just screams for an audio sample. Is Jewel a Wikipedia user? We need a sample! — Frecklefσσt | Talk 16:25, 14 January 2009 (UTC)

    References[edit]

    The only reference in this article seems like an advertisement more than an informational source. I'll try giving this article some proper citations tomorrow, but for now I'm going to change the citation template as the sole reference is lacking. DefenseSupportParty (talk) 08:56, 18 January 2009 (UTC)

    Improving the article[edit]

    I've been working on the article but would appreciate any help. I think I've covered the American performers pretty well, but there may be other yodelers from outside the U.S. that I'm not aware of. Also, I have different forms of yodeling under the "History" section and that should be fixed. I will list some possible improvements and would appreciate any further ideas.

    • Improve lede
    • Add more info on early Swiss yodeling (I can't find anything)
    • More info on other forms of yodeling
    • Re the "Recent developments" section - I have just left what was here but know nothing about it
    • Copy edit my recent additions
    • Add info about The Lion Sleeps Tonight?

    Any other ideas? Gandydancer (talk) 16:02, 10 September 2011 (UTC)

    Well, I've done more work on it. It can be difficult as I find more information here, there, and everywhere... It tends to get jumbled and I'd have done some things differently if I knew when I started what I know now, so I hope it is reading OK. I'd sure appreciate some feedback! I really wondered about how appropriate it was to include the Radio section but it was so important to early music when yodeling was (from what I have since learned) almost a necessity for country music, that I wanted it in the article. Does it seem to fit OK? Gandydancer (talk) 18:18, 14 September 2011 (UTC)
    Looking for the exact place I found info on early traveling minstrels in the UK to give the ref for the "citation needed" tag in the History section (which I have not yet found), I found a great deal of very good info on the early Alpine craze in the US in the 1840s. The info is here: [1]. There is so much good info that I believe I will (perhaps) make a separate heading for it. Gandydancer (talk) 14:37, 15 September 2011 (UTC)
    Some feedback - it's a great article and I enjoyed reading it. It does need some work. It comes across as US focussed, some copy editing is needed but that'll always be an ongoing thing - for example the opening statement "is a form of singing that involves singing" should be reworded, and the lede should summarize the article so I would expect to see mention of the Alpine origins there, and I'd keep details in the other sections (thinking of the first recording). The citation tag is really on the assertion that "performances were common in the British Isles" - it's a relative term which doesn't quantify how popular, or popular in relation to what. Also for accuracy the British Isles incorporates more than the UK, so if the minstrels travelled the UK, then that's what should be used. The references used could also be cleaned up - I'll help out on stuff when I can. --HighKing (talk) 12:44, 16 September 2011 (UTC)
    Thanks, it is so good to get some feedback. I agree with everything you suggest. I am pretty much adding stuff as I find it using Google books. I was really surprised to find the info on early traveling minstrels in the UK...I believe the source used the word "British" - and of course then further surprised to find that they performed in the US as well. As this information is slowly coming together for me I am starting to realize that it is the story of the beginning of country/western music in the US as much as the story of yodeling in the US. I have talked to an editor who if I remember correctly is working on early folk music in the UK, and I believe s/he will be a lot of help when he/she finds the time. Gandydancer (talk) 13:49, 16 September 2011 (UTC)
    No probs - Google Books is a good resource. Personally I prefer to use the {{citation}} template for references even if they're available on Google Books. I've changed a few already at the beginning of the article - have you any thoughts on that? And "British" wouldn't link to "British Isles", should link to either United Kingdom, Great Britain or British people. I think the reference you're looking for is this one which states "In the early nineteenth century, performances of yodelers were common on the British stage". --HighKing (talk) 14:15, 16 September 2011 (UTC)
    Yes, that is the book. I really appreciate that you have fixed my book references, but as for me learning how to do it, I'm not sure that I can learn... I hate to admit it, but I've tried several times to understand how to do my citations properly and have been unable to figure it out. I've had the same problem in figuring out how to post some photos that I'd like to add to Wikipedia Commons collections. I've even asked for help several times and people just say "Oh, it's easy and they refer me to the help page, which has not helped even though I've spent hours trying... Actually I have no computer skills what so ever and have only learned what I know by trial and error. Perhaps I may be able to learn how to re-list any refs from books that you have set up.
    I did a lot of reading over the weekend and some things re history are becoming clearer to me in regards to the very early yodeling in the US. I plan to add a section on early African American yodeling and some of the information from the book in question which predates what I have listed as the first recordings that most historians seem to have used - they seem to have skipped singers such as George Watson, who it seems were doing Alpine yodeling. There are some early recordings but I've been unable to listen to them because my speakers are on the blink - I hope to buy new ones today. Gandydancer (talk) 13:25, 19 September 2011 (UTC)
    Depending on the browser you use, there's a couple of tools available to help form citations. Try looking at WP:CITETOOLS. A pretty easy starting point is the "Reference Builder" and the "Google Books Citation Tool" - both links from that page. --HighKing (talk) 23:17, 20 September 2011 (UTC)

    Too American[edit]

    The article is way too focused on the US and looks like some kind of American Wikipedia. It almost sounds as if yodeling were an american invention. My impression is that in Europe nobody has heard of American yodeling but only of yodeling from the German speaking parts of the Alps, which may explain the lack of European material in the article as English is not widely used in the German speaking countries. It would however be great if someone could write something on Swiss and Austrian yodeling. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 62.199.253.230 (talk) 18:45, 27 January 2013 (UTC)

    Here is the Google translated German article:

    Probably in all mountainous and inaccessible regions of the world there are different techniques to bridge long distances with Call to acoustically. The origins of yodeling date back to prehistoric times: yodeling agreed to herders and gatherers, forest workers and Kohler. Not only in the Alps has been communicated from pasture to pasture with Almschrei (Almschroa) or whoop (Juchetzer, Jugitzer, Juschroa) or cattle with a yodel (Viehruf) attracted.

    Joseph Ratzinger (grew up in Bavaria) suggested the major theologian Augustine of Hippo was referring to yodel when he wrote from Jubilus, a "form of wordless ringing, screaming or singing," the "non-verbal leakage of a joy that is so large that it breaks all the words. "Jubili were called later ritually set melismas of Gregorian chant. Dissemination

    Yodel forms of communication exist among African Pygmies (Mokombi), the Inuit, the Caucasus, in Melanesia, Palestine, China, Thailand and Cambodia, in the USA, Spain ("Alala"), in Sápmi (Lapland) (joiku Also Juoigan), Sweden (Kulning also Kölning, Kaukning), Poland, Slovakia, Romania, Bulgaria and Georgia.

    The yodel is heard today, often in the context of popular music. Among the most famous Bavarian artist heard the yodel king Franzl Lang. [1] In the resin and in the Erzgebirge is yodeling maintained as virtuoso music folklore with competitions, even in the Thuringian Forest and the Thuringian Slate Mountains, it plays an important role in musical traditions.

    The world record in the (permanent) yodeling the Austrian Roland Roßkogler stops at 14 hours 37 minutes. Another world record of the Swiss Peter Hinnen holds: in 1992 he received an entry in the Guinness Book of Records, as he yodel with 22 tones in a single second erected the world record in speed yodel. The jump in the Swiss charts managed 2008 Oesch's the third, thanks to the stimmakrobatischen "Ku-Ku Jodel" Peter Hinnen. [2] Alpine yodeling

    In Alpine folk song Yodel was developed to yodel song musically. A distinction also between the sung yodel - which is sung only in chest voice, and usually only in short sequences between song verses - and the defeated yodel in the chest and falsetto change frequently and skillfully. Beaten yodel can be very long and require regular vocal acrobatics.

    Original yodel were often practiced solo, most yodeling songs are more consistent and appear frequently as sweeping and final chorus of folk songs. Especially in Switzerland, but also in the rest of the Alpine region has the 19th Century developed a care in the Jodlers choirs. Even the church, religious folk music tradition, such as in South Tyrol knows, one or several voices yodel. And also instrumental yodel be played by small groups.

    Local names are Wullaza (Styria), Almer (Upper Austria), Dudler (Lower Austria and Vienna) [3], Gallnen (Upper Bavaria), Ari (Bavarian Forest), Roller (Upper Harz), Zäuerli or Ruggusseli (Appenzell), whoop and others.

    Probably the most extensive collection yodel was published in 1902 by Josef Pommer: 444 yodel and Juchezer. Yodeling world

    Even outside of the European Alps and the music was so typically associated and yodeling used as a stylistic device, the American DJ and "yodel researchers" Bart Plantenga, according to almost thirty different styles of music. [4]

    Particularly in the U.S. and Australia to yodel in the field of country music had an important place. After the beginning of the 19th Century came in the Appalachians to the first links between alpine yodeling and Anglo-American traditions was awakened in the 30s by guest performances Austrian and Swiss artists to a wider public for the first time the interest on yodeling. Increasingly, there were also performances by American artists in this style. At the same time came in itinerant vaudeville and minstrel shows in the wake of African American traditions, a new-style yodel, which was also influenced by the blues. This was taken up by white Old Time musicians, 1924 the guitarist Riley Puckett one (then called) "hillbilly" song with yodeling. The American country singer Jimmie Rodgers Yodeling developed 1927 the Blue, where he enriched elements of blues and traditional white music with yodeling. His first hit T for Texas (Blue Yodel) attracted many followers with him and inspired countless musicians to emulate him.

    In addition, the yodeling is still an important part of Western Music, differs profoundly from those performances there in the country.

    In jazz, Leon Thomas was a prominent exponent. He put the yodel as a stylistic one when Scat and resorted to for-African influences, such as the yodel of the pygmies, with their singing traditions he had studied intensively. [5] The way was in this context, his collaboration with Pharoah Sanders The Creator Has A Master Plan (1969).

    Contemporary artists such as the yodelling Swiss Christine Lauterburg, Christina Zurbrügg or the German Thomas Hauser. [6] Curiosities

    I certainly have attempted to to globalize the article (see above section where I ask for assist). I speak only English but if anyone can assist with the article, it certainly would be appreciated. Gandydancer (talk) 16:37, 28 January 2013 (UTC)

    I've just been looking at WP:SPINOFF. Does anyone else think it would be a good idea to spin Yodeling (USA) out into a new article? --Northernhenge (talk) 23:54, 2 February 2013 (UTC)

    I don't think I would care to see it split. Looking at other countries versions of this article, it seems to me that I am not making this one too American at all. Since the Americans transformed the basic Austrian yodel into a blues, cowboy, "hillbilly", and other types of yodel it is reasonable that I would have covered that with as much information as I could find. I also added info from Australia - as much as I could find - since I came to understand that it's popular Down Under. I found this article: [2] and will see if there is anything and will continue to look for added info, but for now I am satisfied. Gandydancer (talk) 13:45, 6 February 2013 (UTC)

    Pygmy singers in Central Africa[edit]

    According to the Pygmy peoples article,

    "The term "pygmy" is sometimes considered pejorative. However, there is no single term to replace it. Many prefer to be identified by their ethnicity, such as the Aka (Mbenga), Baka, Mbuti, and Twa. The term Bayaka, the plural form of the Aka/Yaka, is sometimes used in the Central African Republic to refer to all local pygmies."

    This article specifically refers to Central Africa, so is it appropriate to replace Pygmy with Bayaka? (I don't know the answer - I'm just concerned about the use of a term that can be pejorative if there's a less offensive word available.) --Northernhenge (talk) 21:21, 31 July 2013 (UTC)

    Reading the various Pygmy-related articles, it seems that we are freely using the term. I tend to think that it's OK, but I certainly am open to further discussion. Gandydancer (talk) 22:14, 31 July 2013 (UTC)
    The link to Pygmy music seems like a really good solution. Well spotted! --Northernhenge (talk) 22:30, 31 July 2013 (UTC)

    "Examples" deleted in 2008[edit]

    I was about to add some Alpine yodelers who are notable because they already have Wikipedia articles. Then I noticed "Alpine yodeling can be heard in the songs of Franzl Lang, Stefanie Hertel, Zillertaler Schürzenjäger, Ursprung Buam, Harry Torrani, and Mary Schneider" had been deleted in 2008 (moved to the talk page) because "The above content is unreferenced, random, and is just creating an unmanageable list of WP:Trivia". I've added Oesch’s die Dritten because they're mentioned on the German page but what do other editors think about the others? They have pages. They yodel. Why not include them? --Northernhenge (talk) 21:51, 31 July 2013 (UTC)

    Thanks for your input. I wrote most of this article even though I started with little knowledge about it and only found info from here and there as I went along. Thus, it was a very hard write. The more I read the more I realized that many sources were wrong. There was no mention, and I had never heard, that it was the African American influence that actually produced what is now considered American yodeling. Not that I was surprised since they are actually at the root of so much of our musical art. I appreciate your help with this article! Gandydancer (talk) 22:41, 31 July 2013 (UTC)
    I enjoyed reading the article and learned a lot from it. There's more to be said about alpine yodeling. I've discovered there are some things I like about it but I don't yet know much about it unfortunately. One thing I've noticed is that the words of a lot of yodeling songs seem to be about yodeling. It's as if the commercial end of the yodeling business is more about celebrating a tradition and less about participating in the tradition, but I really am a long way out of my depth here. I'll leave the article alone until I've though of something sensible to contribute! --Northernhenge (talk) 10:47, 1 August 2013 (UTC)
    OK. I think that the article is much improved with your edit that divided the large section into countries, though I did go further and give Canada its own section as well. Gandydancer (talk) 15:08, 1 August 2013 (UTC)

    Helpful site[edit]

    I'd like to park this site here as a useful page for future edits. I'd especially like to add some info on the Mississippi Sheiks. [3] (Bo Carter was from the Mississippi Sheiks.) ;-) Gandydancer (talk) 16:24, 1 August 2013 (UTC)

    As a reminder to myself, or anyone that wants to help to improve this article, I'd like to include a section on Okeh Records who did so much to record Race records for those of us who enjoy reading the history of American music. Gandydancer (talk) 18:15, 1 August 2013 (UTC) I also saved this site some time ago: [4] I am also looking for an old site I had when I was hoping to add a cowboy yodeling section. Gandydancer (talk) 01:30, 4 August 2013 (UTC)
    Yodeling existed in African American life before there were recordings to capture the sound. Author John Wesley Work describes[5] how a black man might vocalize a loud "holler" (a series of sung notes) as he was approaching the house of a friend or family member. His holler would be unique—it would identify him to those who were familiar with it. The holler was a series of notes and often included one or more yodels. Grey Gundaker and Tynes Cowan trace the practice[6] to Central Africa, for instance to pygmy hunters who still communicate their identity and whereabouts through yodeling vocalizations. Frederick Law Olmsted heard Negro workers in South Carolina in 1855 and called their style "Negro jodling" and "the Carolina yell". The two books linked here say that the holler/yodel was worked into blues singing. There is no connection to the Alps or Swiss yodeling in these explanations of American folk music. Binksternet (talk) 21:40, 1 August 2013 (UTC)
    I've included field holler info and info from Olmsted. Bink, you might like to read Gandy dancer and listen to the music links provided. The site that hosts the Gandy dancer documentary has a lot of other interesting docs as well. Re the southern hollers/Alpine yodeling, The Singing Brakeman is the connection between Alpine and American yodeling. (And blues too--his first ten yodels are named "Blue Yodel #1, #2, etc.) Jimmie Rogers was the Elvis Presley of his time. Like Elvis, he came just when the world was ready for a revolution in music. And they both funneled the Divine into the waiting world when they combined the best of the black and of the white. (Haha, but I actually mean that. :-) )Gandydancer (talk) 14:20, 2 August 2013 (UTC)

    Just now reading the talk page at the Jimmie Rodgers article I found these two posts:

    Just listened to a radio report about the discovery of a tribe in Kenya that worship him as a fertility god (serious report)..apparently in the 30's they got records of him, and figuring no one could sing that well and be mortal they started dancing to him as a form of worhsip.

    See BBC radio 2 report Radcliffe and Marconni show, 28/10/2009 about 1 hr 50 mins into show. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 119.92.84.178 (talk) 07:18, 29 October 2009 (UTC)

    Not sure 'bout the fertility god bit but the CBC in Canada had a documentary on cargo cults that included this. The people in one area had even changed their music to emulate the high register he sang in. They referred to him as "Chemmie Rohja" CU L8R AV8R ... J-P (talk) 05:16, 16 February 2010 (UTC) Gandydancer (talk) 12:59, 3 August 2013 (UTC)

    I wonder what these field hollers sound like--my speakers are not working. [7] Gandydancer (talk) 01:14, 4 August 2013 (UTC)

    Yodelers category[edit]

    I thought I'd go through this article and make sure everyone it mentions is included in Category:Yodelers. The first one I looked at was Riley Puckett and I immediately stopped to think again. Is being a yodeler a defining characteristic of Riley Puckett? I don't know. Should everyone mentioned on this page be categorised as a yodeler or should that be kept for musicians who are first and foremost yodelers? (I should probably have posted this on the category talk page but I expect not many people watch category talk pages.) --Northernhenge (talk) 22:01, 2 August 2013 (UTC)

    Certainly "a defining characteristic" would be true for Puckett. As for the list, it is my impression that that list only means that they do at least sometimes yodel. The list if far from complete...I have little interest in lists. Gandydancer (talk) 13:04, 3 August 2013 (UTC)

    African yodeling[edit]

    More sources can be found describing an African source of yodeling, as well as yodeling from other non-European places.

    • Africanisms in American Culture, p. 380. Comparing African yodeling to African-American field hollers. Debunking unnamed ethnomusicologists who say that Alpine yodeling and African yodeling are qualitatively different. (That there is no "true yodeling" different from African "falsetto leaps".) Written by John Edward Philips, his chapter named "The African Heritage of White America".
    • Work Songs, page 75. Music historian Ted Gioia says that yodeling was known in the Scottish Highlands among cattle herders and cattle thieves. Yodeling was also known in the Solomon Islands. Gioia says that "Africa must take a back seat to Europe" in regard to yodeling in work songs—he does not think African yodeling was used for work songs in Africa as the inhabitants of that continent were not cattle herders.
    • The Sounds of Slavery, pages 23–24. African yodeling was one element of the African-American field holler, along with melisma and chromatic slides. Lucy McKim Garrison (at the time named Lucy McKim) studied African-American field hollers and noted the yodeling within them (pages 31 and 35).
    • Da Capo Best Music Writing 2006, page 94. Yodeling has been found in native cultures of Brazil's Bororo Indians, in Papua New Guinea, as well as throughout Europe.
    • Yale musicologist Robert Farris Thompson is frequently quoted on the subject of yodeling in Africa. He wrote in 1993 a book titled Face of the gods: art and altars of Africa and the African Americas. I think this is the one where he traces yodeling. Binksternet (talk) 22:53, 3 August 2013 (UTC)

    Comments[edit]

    Made a first pass at copy-editing... learned a lot of stuff! Folks will notice that I moved "Technique" to the top, first because it's essential and quick, and second because "History" seems to belong more with the other sections". In fact, it might be advisable to reorganize these sections somehow, since there's so much overlap between "History", "Performers", and "Notable performers". (One of the sections in "History" is bracketed off for now because it seems to be directly copied from an outside website. The copying is bad and it also seems we could probably do better for sources. There's also a lot of US-centrism, although it's very clear that the story of yodeling in the U.S. has a lot of intrigue to it. Nice work so far... I had no idea yodeling was so interesting. groupuscule (talk) 23:13, 6 August 2013 (UTC)

    I so appreciate your critical eye! This was a very hard write for me because when I started I had no idea that there are two kinds of yodels: There is Alpine yodel and there is blue yodel. My first searches barely hinted at the African American roots and it was not until I came across the Abott and Ser... (I forget) information that I began to understand the strong connection. I included that long quote from their book because it is so complicated and so important that I knew no other way to say it all. And the thing is, as far as I know they are the only ones that really get it: Once again it is the African influence that, like tap dancing, soul, and jazz, gave America a new art form. Ideally I would have had a good book to use as a way to organize the article--but I didn't. As such, I am aware that in some instances information seems a little out of place. Please feel free to question anything and organize as you feel is needed. If you have time read the talk page re US-centrism. Gandydancer (talk) 23:53, 6 August 2013 (UTC)
    I've changed some heading levels which may help with the US-centric issue. The effect is clearest in the table of contents. I wasn't sure what to do with the "Early English yodelers" section as one of them seems to be american-style and one sems to be european-style so I just left it by itself for now. I won't object if anyone reverts the edit! --Northernhenge (talk) 21:53, 7 August 2013 (UTC)
    Yes, it's better. I moved "English" up and changed it to European. I suppose it would be good to expand the section, but as you can see from the translated German site (above) there is not much to go with... Do whatever you want--I'm not bashful and will certainly object if I don't like it! :-} Gandydancer (talk) 22:35, 7 August 2013 (UTC)

    Translations[edit]

    Why NOT translate a title provided in German? Mkilby 15 Jan 2014

    I have made two attempts to provide a helpful translation to the song title "Über jedes Bacherl geht a Brückerl" cited in the article. Both were reverted by moderators. I see no reason to force the user to obtain a substandard machine translation, when it is simpler to place the words directly into the online text. Mkilby (talk) 12:59, 15 January 2014 (UTC)
    The translation does not help the reader understand yodeling. The article is about yodeling. Binksternet (talk) 14:33, 15 January 2014 (UTC)

    External links modified[edit]

    Hello fellow Wikipedians,

    I have just added archive links to one external link on Yodeling. Please take a moment to review my edit. If necessary, add {{cbignore}} after the link to keep me from modifying it. Alternatively, you can add {{nobots|deny=InternetArchiveBot}} to keep me off the page altogether. I made the following changes:

    When you have finished reviewing my changes, please set the checked parameter below to true to let others know.

    As of February 2018, "External links modified" talk page sections are no longer generated or monitored by InternetArchiveBot. No special action is required regarding these talk page notices, other than regular verification using the archive tool instructions below. Editors have permission to delete these "External links modified" talk page sections if they want to de-clutter talk pages, but see the RfC before doing mass systematic removals. This message is updated dynamically through the template {{sourcecheck}} (last update: 15 July 2018).

    • If you have discovered URLs which were erroneously considered dead by the bot, you can report them with this tool.
    • If you found an error with any archives or the URLs themselves, you can fix them with this tool.


    Cheers. —cyberbot IITalk to my owner:Online 04:09, 18 October 2015 (UTC)

    External links modified[edit]

    Hello fellow Wikipedians,

    I have just added archive links to one external link on Yodeling. Please take a moment to review my edit. If necessary, add {{cbignore}} after the link to keep me from modifying it. Alternatively, you can add {{nobots|deny=InternetArchiveBot}} to keep me off the page altogether. I made the following changes:

    When you have finished reviewing my changes, please set the checked parameter below to true or failed to let others know (documentation at {{Sourcecheck}}).

    As of February 2018, "External links modified" talk page sections are no longer generated or monitored by InternetArchiveBot. No special action is required regarding these talk page notices, other than regular verification using the archive tool instructions below. Editors have permission to delete these "External links modified" talk page sections if they want to de-clutter talk pages, but see the RfC before doing mass systematic removals. This message is updated dynamically through the template {{sourcecheck}} (last update: 15 July 2018).

    • If you have discovered URLs which were erroneously considered dead by the bot, you can report them with this tool.
    • If you found an error with any archives or the URLs themselves, you can fix them with this tool.


    Cheers.—cyberbot IITalk to my owner:Online 06:01, 28 February 2016 (UTC)

    External links modified[edit]

    Hello fellow Wikipedians,

    I have just modified 2 external links on Yodeling. Please take a moment to review my edit. If you have any questions, or need the bot to ignore the links, or the page altogether, please visit this simple FaQ for additional information. I made the following changes:

    When you have finished reviewing my changes, please set the checked parameter below to true or failed to let others know (documentation at {{Sourcecheck}}).

    As of February 2018, "External links modified" talk page sections are no longer generated or monitored by InternetArchiveBot. No special action is required regarding these talk page notices, other than regular verification using the archive tool instructions below. Editors have permission to delete these "External links modified" talk page sections if they want to de-clutter talk pages, but see the RfC before doing mass systematic removals. This message is updated dynamically through the template {{sourcecheck}} (last update: 15 July 2018).

    • If you have discovered URLs which were erroneously considered dead by the bot, you can report them with this tool.
    • If you found an error with any archives or the URLs themselves, you can fix them with this tool.


    Cheers.—InternetArchiveBot (Report bug) 16:31, 16 July 2016 (UTC)

    External links modified[edit]

    Hello fellow Wikipedians,

    I have just modified one external link on Yodeling. Please take a moment to review my edit. If you have any questions, or need the bot to ignore the links, or the page altogether, please visit this simple FaQ for additional information. I made the following changes:

    When you have finished reviewing my changes, please set the checked parameter below to true or failed to let others know (documentation at {{Sourcecheck}}).

    As of February 2018, "External links modified" talk page sections are no longer generated or monitored by InternetArchiveBot. No special action is required regarding these talk page notices, other than regular verification using the archive tool instructions below. Editors have permission to delete these "External links modified" talk page sections if they want to de-clutter talk pages, but see the RfC before doing mass systematic removals. This message is updated dynamically through the template {{sourcecheck}} (last update: 15 July 2018).

    • If you have discovered URLs which were erroneously considered dead by the bot, you can report them with this tool.
    • If you found an error with any archives or the URLs themselves, you can fix them with this tool.


    Cheers.—InternetArchiveBot (Report bug) 17:50, 20 July 2016 (UTC)

    External links modified[edit]

    Hello fellow Wikipedians,

    I have just modified one external link on Yodeling. Please take a moment to review my edit. If you have any questions, or need the bot to ignore the links, or the page altogether, please visit this simple FaQ for additional information. I made the following changes:

    When you have finished reviewing my changes, please set the checked parameter below to true or failed to let others know (documentation at {{Sourcecheck}}).

    As of February 2018, "External links modified" talk page sections are no longer generated or monitored by InternetArchiveBot. No special action is required regarding these talk page notices, other than regular verification using the archive tool instructions below. Editors have permission to delete these "External links modified" talk page sections if they want to de-clutter talk pages, but see the RfC before doing mass systematic removals. This message is updated dynamically through the template {{sourcecheck}} (last update: 15 July 2018).

    • If you have discovered URLs which were erroneously considered dead by the bot, you can report them with this tool.
    • If you found an error with any archives or the URLs themselves, you can fix them with this tool.


    Cheers.—InternetArchiveBot (Report bug) 07:09, 9 November 2016 (UTC)

    External links modified[edit]

    Hello fellow Wikipedians,

    I have just modified one external link on Yodeling. Please take a moment to review my edit. If you have any questions, or need the bot to ignore the links, or the page altogether, please visit this simple FaQ for additional information. I made the following changes:

    When you have finished reviewing my changes, you may follow the instructions on the template below to fix any issues with the URLs.

    As of February 2018, "External links modified" talk page sections are no longer generated or monitored by InternetArchiveBot. No special action is required regarding these talk page notices, other than regular verification using the archive tool instructions below. Editors have permission to delete these "External links modified" talk page sections if they want to de-clutter talk pages, but see the RfC before doing mass systematic removals. This message is updated dynamically through the template {{sourcecheck}} (last update: 15 July 2018).

    • If you have discovered URLs which were erroneously considered dead by the bot, you can report them with this tool.
    • If you found an error with any archives or the URLs themselves, you can fix them with this tool.


    Cheers.—InternetArchiveBot (Report bug) 19:33, 3 September 2017 (UTC)